Make a hedgehog house for your garden

We’re getting toward hedgehogs’ hibernation season, so Sarah built a hedgehog house for her garden, and wrote up her process for others to follow. It’s a fun weekend project; if you make one, we’d love to hear about it. Of course, we have all the tools you need in the hackspace, for all members to use. Call in to one of our open sessions to take a look.


Use a hand saw to cut a 6” diameter pipe to min 30cm.  (Electric saws will melt, not cut the plastic.)  File the edge smooth.  This is the entrance tunnel that will prevent foxes/badgers etc fishing the hedgehogs out of the house.

Sarah's Hedgehog house 1

Balance a 30L storage box on the end of the pipe and draw around the end of the pipe with a marker pen.

Sarah's Hedgehog house 3Sarah's Hedgehog house 2

 

 

 

 

Use a dremel or similar on a slow setting  to cut out inside of the pen line.

Sarah's Hedgehog house 4

File smooth the inside and outside of the cut edge.   Use the marker pen to measure out 3cm points along both long sides, under the overhang.

Sarah's Hedgehog house 5

Drill ventilation holes through each pen mark on both sides.

Sarah's Hedgehog house 6Sarah's Hedgehog house 7

 

 

 

 

 

Unscrew the nut and remove the washers from the 90 bend pipe.  Place against the short end of the box, near the top edge and draw around the inside of the washer. Use a hole bit to drill out the same size hole as the pipe.  Put the washer on the pipe and nut.  Fasten the pipe to the box.

Sarah's Hedgehog house 8Sarah's Hedgehog house 9

 

 

 

 

 

Drill 6 drainage holes in the bottom of the box

Sarah's Hedgehog house 10

Push the large pipe into the big hole in the box.  Put the lid on.

Sarah's Hedgehog house 11

Locate the box in a quiet area of the garden, with the pipe pointing away from prevailing winds / the north / east.  Cover with leaves, but do not fill with anything.  Apparently, hedgehogs prefer to find their own bedding.  Make sure there are holes in your & your neighbours’ garden fence/hedge/wall/gate so they can get into your garden.  They will roam 1-2 kilometres a night looking for food so access is important.

One the box is installed, do not disturb.  Clean annually in early Oct with cleaner used for bird cages.

Sarah's Hedgehog house 12

Bookcase with clock stand

One of my own projects this time: a bookcase with an upright to hold a favourite clock. I didn’t want to drive nails into my (rented, plasterboard) walls and can always use extra shelf space, so I came up with this as a woodworking project. I’m a complete beginner at woodworking, so I learned a lot making this and had a lot of help from other hackspace members. It’s not perfect, but it does its job and I still have all my fingers so I’m calling it a success. At least, until I start work on version 2…

Want to learn some woodwork, or any of the other crafts and skills that our members get up to? Come along to your local hackspace!

A few recent snapshots

A few of the things we’ve been up to in the hackspace over the past week or two: Sewable arduinos (floras) and crochet, woodworking on the new lathe, silverwork on the jewellery bench, soldering up some electronics projects, painting the walls for our cellar expansion while planning the next builds, and lots of coding, writing and chatter.

Want to meet a friendly group of makers, whether to work on your own projects or as a beginner to learn new skills? Call in to one of our open sessions to see the workshop, say hi, and learn about how the group works.

At our latest Monday open session:

Lots going on at our latest open session: lasercutting shadowbox art, testing a pancake laser-engraving machine, making cosplay armour, and building a wireless arduino project. Got an idea? Make it with us! Come to one of our open sessions to see the workshop, chat, and join in!

 

 

Hillsfest 2016

We had a good time at Hillsfest this year! Lots of friends and new faces with stalls in the Maker’s Dome, and we really enjoyed chatting with everyone who came up to make wollen bobbles (Thanks to Jo and Sarah for running that!), and ask about all the 3D printed, lasercut and otherwise member-built things we had on display.

We know a lot of you signed up to the mailing list, and a lot more plan to drop into one of our scheduled sessions at our workshop in Portland Works. Come along! See the space, chat with our other members and find out what your local hackspace can do for you.

Hillsfest 2016 GoBoxes Hillsfest 2016 OJ Hillsfest 2016 Bobbles

New equipment — Wadkin Pattern Makers Lathe

 

Wadkin lathe 3

We’re getting our newest toy set up here at SHHM. We’re being gifted the long-term loan of a Wadkin woodworking lathe, that accepts workpieces up to 7 feet long and, in principle, over a yard in diameter. It’s up and running in our new cellar space, we just need to get hold of some PPE to use it safely. There should be some workshops coming up, covering things like safe useage, basic shapes, bowl turning, etc. We can’t wait!

As ever, if you’re not a member yet but are interested in using our workshops for your projects, or want to learn to make stuff with a friendly crowd, get in touch or just turn up to one of our scheduled meetings and say hi.

Wadkin lathe 1Wadkin lathe 2

Inkscape for Beginners workshop

Inkscape Workshop in progress

 

Did you get to our Inkscape For Beginners workshop? We had fun afternoon with a mix of members and new people, learning the basics of Inkscape (2D graphics / design package, ideal for making lasercutter templates) and swapping tips and tricks. If there are other workshops you want to attend — or want us to run this one again! — let us know!

Even better, if there’s something fun or potentially useful that you can teach to a complete beginner, offer to run a workshop! SHHM are reliably an engaged and friendly audience, and teaching complete beginners is easier than you’d think.

Nixie clock prototype

Lasercut nixie clock prototype

This caught my eye at yesterday’s Open Hackspace session: Alex wired up the nixie clock he’s been prototyping, and got it mounted in a lasercut case. As good at it looks here, the phone camera doesn’t do it justice!

Other projects being worked on yesterday included a pedal-powered phone/GPS charger for an upcoming cycling holiday (which now works perfectly!), an improved bed for the lasercutter, some wooden shelf units, a network-controlled table lamp/sensor package, and the usual mix of teaching, swapping ideas, and terrible jokes.

What do you want to make? Turn up to one of our open sessions, or get in touch by email, and see what your local Hackspace can do for you!