Arduino Day 2017

Its that time of year once again! Arduino Day 2017!!

On April 1st (no joke!), for the third year running, we will be hosting an Arduino Day event at the hackspace.

The event itself will begin at 10am and will include several talks from current members on Arduino basics, a show and tell of projects that have been made using Arduino and, of course, the workshop will be open for anyone to try their hand at building something, with lots of members on hand to help out.

For non-members the event will be free to attend so if you think you know anyone that would be interested in learning about this invaluable digital making tool, or would just like to learn something new please share this post with them.

An exact schedule of events will be posted nearer to the event, but currently our “basics” talks will happen in the morning to then free up the afternoon for any making that people want to do after the morning talks.

Electromagnetic Field 2016

A great weekend was had by all as multiple members of SHH&M went down to Loseley Park for EMF2016. Our entrepid woodworker, AJ, went ahead of the rest of us to build the sink frames, back of the bar and multiple other items ahead of over 1400 people decending for a weekend of camping. However, as should be expected from a group of hackers and makers camping, electricity and high speed internet were essential amenities. We had our own Village, complete with flag, and took along some Go-Boxes and Bugs’s pancake engraver to show off (blog to follow!).

Events over the weekend included numerous talks from lockpicking to film special effects and latest updates from CERN to magic tricks and illusions. There was also the opportunity to make a wide range of things such as a titanium spork, a patchwork pin cushion and a pin hole camera. Evening events included film showings, the infamous Robot Arms with NottyHacks Barbot, a light maze and FirePong – yep, ping pong with fire! There was also a giant blow up rabbit which you could change the colour of by tweeting a colour!

All the talks are available to watch on You Tube if you feel want to catch-up with anything.

A one day event is planned for next year, with the next EMF camp due in 2018. If this year is anything to go by, both should be highly recommended!

 

Blue Bunny

Blue Bunny

White Bunny

White Bunny

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Red Lightfield

Blue Lightfield

Blue Lightfield

Box making

Recently I thought that I would experiment with some new methods for box making. This particular box is made from pine, not exactly something you would use to make quality furniture with but it is really only a practise piece.

The box is joined together with mitered splines, the top and bottom panels are rebated 15mm in from each end. I made the box as one piece before separating the top using the table saw. I also put a chamfer on the front bottom edge of the box and the top of the box lid as well as the top edge on the inside of the panel, this made it look a little more decorative and also hides any uneven gaps that may appear between the lid. I cut the grooves for the splines using a jig I made for the table saw that holds the box at a 45′ angle to the blade. I finished it off with a few coats of varnish.

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I’m hoping to do some more intricate box making using some finer hardwoods in the future but overall this project went really well, next time I think I’m going to get hold of some jewelry box style hinges, I used piano hinge on this box which was not idea and is a bit of a pain to work with.

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Hillsfest 2016

We had a good time at Hillsfest this year! Lots of friends and new faces with stalls in the Maker’s Dome, and we really enjoyed chatting with everyone who came up to make wollen bobbles (Thanks to Jo and Sarah for running that!), and ask about all the 3D printed, lasercut and otherwise member-built things we had on display.

We know a lot of you signed up to the mailing list, and a lot more plan to drop into one of our scheduled sessions at our workshop in Portland Works. Come along! See the space, chat with our other members and find out what your local hackspace can do for you.

Hillsfest 2016 GoBoxes Hillsfest 2016 OJ Hillsfest 2016 Bobbles

Quadrant 3D Printer Cabinet

With the Hackspace having a collection of three different 3D printers and with them all being kept in one multi use workshop, it soon came apparent that we needed a way to keep the dust of of them all whiles also allowing us to gain easy access to them for maintenance. There was an ideal place in the workshop between the workbench and tool board where a cabinet would sit nicely.

With this in mind I took some measurements of the area and make a few rough sketches on paper. The cabinet would be 1200 x 600 x 2000 it would be divided up in to 6 quadrants, the top 4 quadrants will be where the 3D printers would be housed and the bottom two would

3D model of the cabinet

3D model of the cabinet

create storage space for reels of filament and other consumables. At the rear of each of the 4 printer quadrants there would be a 2G plug and RJ45 socket as each of the printers will run of OctoPi allowing the printers to be controlled remotely on the network. Once I had a feel for what the cabinet was going to look like on paper I drew up a 3D model using Free CAD.

 

The material of choice was 18mm construction ply, for the method of joinery I went for rebate joints. Each of the panels that the shelf’s and back would sit in had a rebate grove in the width of the ply routed down the width of the panel at the corresponding heights of the shelf’s the rebate was half the depth of the material. The cut away below shows half of the cabinet and how it is assembled. With the CAD design complete I got to work ripping all of the ply down to size ready for routing.

Cut away of the cabinet showing the rebate joints

Cut away of the cabinet showing the rebate joints


To ensure that all of the rebates where routed consistently I used a straight edge to guide the router on all the parts. By scoring each side of the rebate joints with a sharp knife before routing prevents tear out from the spinning cutter leaving a nicer and smoother finish. For routing the rebate on the perimeter of the back the router was used with it’s fens, the fens was set to the correct width from the cutter to the edge of the work piece and run down the edge.

To assemble the cabinet the shelf’s where first glued and nailed on to the two sides, this step was completed first because  you could only get a run of nails in one side of the middle. The middle and top where then joined the same way followed by the back. After a sand and coat of varnish the cabinet was ready to be moved in to the workshop.

The assembled cabinet in place ready for the doors to be hung.

The assembled cabinet in place ready for the doors to be hung.

Once the assembly was complete I decided to add some pull out shelf’s on rails, this would make it easier to remove things from the print bed and gain access to the back of the printer for maintenance.

door frame glued up

door frame glued up

To make the door frames I created a central groove using a table saw in several lengths of 20 x 35mm PSE timber. This grove would be where the perspex in the centre of the door would sit. The rails and stiles where cut to the correct length and a tenon was made on the end of both of the horizontal rails. The perspex sheet was cut to size and the frame was glued up using a pair of sash clamps. I used piano hinge to hang the doors, this was mounted on to the cabinet first.

The first door mounted

The first door mounted

All that was left to do now was install the rest of the doors, give them a coat of varnish, wire in the electrics and mount the pull out shelves. With the 3D printer cabinet approaching completion there where a few things that I could have done differently and some things that could be improved or even added on. One thing that could be different is the method of joinery, there are a multitude of different ways that it cold be done the other witch I looked in to was finger joints. Finer joints provide a larger surface area for glue to stick to but are more time consuming. I ended up using rebate joints because they where more suited to the design, not only that but would also give me more experience for the next job where I could attempt something a little more complex with the skills I have learnt.

The completed quadrant 3D Printer cabinet with pull out shelfs.

The completed quadrant 3D Printer cabinet with pull out shelfs.

Something else that would have helped during the build process is to have made a jig that could be set over the rebate and clamped down that the router would sit in and slide across, making the process of routing the rebates much more efficient and accurate quicker. A later addition that I intend on adding is a set of castor boxes for the bottom two quadrants witch will make it easier to retrieve consumables. Overall it has been a fairly successfully build. The cabinet itself is very sturdy and provides the purpose it was intended for it also provides more storage areas both on top of the cabinet and down below in the two quadrants.

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For more images please visit here.

We Exist!

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SHH&M are proud to announce that we’re officially incorporated as a company! We’re a member-run, non-profit Community Interest Company, with the mission of “helping people in Sheffield to make creative use of technology and tools for hobby-scale projects in fields such as computers, machining, technology, science, and digital or electronic art”.

More simply, we’re a Hackspace for Sheffield.

These are very early days for us, but if you’re interested get in touch!

At the moment, we’re busy renovating our new home in the Portland Works in central Sheffield. Our first proper public events will be very soon!

We have a Logo!

The Sheffield Hardware Hackers and Makers now has an official logo, with thanks to John. Over the weekend he created us a fantastically, well thought out and prestigious logo. We can now put a name to our face and start to show who we are.

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I think that we can all agree that a large laser cut version of the logo is on the TO DO…. and maby even with some key rings… 🙂

Thanks John!

Don’t forget! There is an Open Lab Planned for Saturday the 15th in the Refab Lab at Access Space.

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December the 14th Build Day

On december the 14th we had our monthly build day at Access Space. We had a large array of 3D printers and electronic projects
being worked on, some of the things that went on throughout the day include...
- 3D Printing parts to improve the hack space
- Laser Cutting
- Tinkering with electronics

3D Printing parts to improve the hack space

We have been hosting our meet-ups at Access Space for around 9 months now. From the start Access Space has very kindly given us a space in there Refab Lab for us to store and use our 3D Printers. We where asked to put forward suggestions for in ways witch we
could improve the hack space. We discussed with Access Space about making it an easier space to work in. We decided to create and print some coat hooks. We drew up some 3D coat hooks in Open SCAD, a free open source 3D CAD programme.

3D Printed coat hook being drawn up in Open SCAD

Once the object had been Compiled and Rendered it was exported as a STL file, it could then be sliced and printed. altogether we
printed four of the coat hooks, in total we had three printers on the Job. Including the small foldable, portable printer that
has been made by one of the group members (we will try any get picture).

3D coat hook being printed

This above is this is the finished product. The coat hooks where mounted on to a pice of wood witch was screwed on to a shelving
unit.

Laser Cutting

One of the 3D printers that was brought along to the build day was a SUMPOD Delta, this printers X,Y and Z axis sit on three
threaded rods. Some pieces where designed using Ink Scape (a 2D open source CAD programme) and laser cut. The pieces where to
mount the stepper motors on to the printer.

SUMPOD Delta 3D Printer

Among all of this we also had some people with Arduino's creating projects, including light synthesisers.  

We would also like to thank Access Space for providing us with a work space and access to tools and machinery in there Refab Lab.
The next meet up will be held at Access Space on the on January the 27th.

You can keep in contact with us by following us on Twitter @SHHMakers or on our forum at: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/sheffield-hardware-hackers

November The 25th Meet Up

This meet up we had many things to be discuss. Some of the things that we went through…

-A review of the Hacker Day at the Hallam University
-Festival of the Mind 2014
-3D Printing in Sheffield
-When the next build day will be held

Following a successful Hacker day at Hallam University we returned to Access Space. At this event we had met a fair few number of new people who showed interest in the group.
Because the Mendel 90 had been transported around it needed some work doing to it. The printer did not seem to be homing it’s Z axis. It was soon apparent that one of the cables for the Z micro switch had worked its way off. This was an easy fix, the cable was re-soldered on to the micro switch. When we tried to home all of the axis, the Z axis did not want to move at all. On closer inspection, the right hand threaded rod was screwed in so tight at the bottom that the stepper motor was unable to move it. Once we had loosened the threaded rod the z axis were free to move. Before we were able to move the machine the Z axis needed to be levelled we did this by positioning the Z axis at about 100mm above the heated bed. Then using a spirit level placed on top of the extruder assembly, the Z axis was levelled by twisting the coupling on the threaded rod.
We then cleaned out the extruder this was done with a small piece of flexible wire bent in to a long U shape. The extruder was then heated up to temperature. The extruders idler was then removed and the hobbed bolt was cleaned. The thin wire was then inserted down the extruder. The extruder was then turned off and left to cool by 20°c. The wire was then removed from the extruder. This process was repeated several times. Once we had completed that we reassembled the extruder and pressed print. It worked just as new!

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We also had a discussion about Festival of the Mind 2014, the themes for next year are:
-Change
-Chaos
-Global
-Joy
-Resilience
-Urban

We talked about doing something along the lines of hacking and maybe some Arduino projects, but they were only things that we drafted up at the meet up. If you can think of any other ideas regarding Festival of the Mind 2014 then let us know on Twitter @SHHMakers or our forum.

3D Printing in Sheffield

We only recently found out about a company called ‘We Do 3D Printing’ who are based in Sheffield, they sell items and components for 3D Printers. The company has a online shop set up on eBay. Because of where Sheffield is located it is an ideal focal point for collaborating on projects as well as having places to use 3D Printers and Laser Cutters.

Next Build Day

We now have a build day planned for the 14th of December between 10am to 4pm. You can bring along your projects, get advice from other group members and have access to the Refab Lab in Access Space with the Laser Cutter, CNC Router, 3D Printers and more.
Let us know if you are coming ether by our forum or on Twitter @SHHMakers.